Deciphering Sushi Garnish

 

This is aji from the Mie prefecture, over akazu rice. Aka is red. Zu su or osu is vinegar. Akazu is used in Edomae Edo is what Tokyo was called sushi, the traditional Tokyo sushi. Red vinegar sleeps for three years before it can be used for consumption.

Akazu vinegar sushi basically ruined me from enjoying sushi made with clear vinegar. The acids are toned down and akazu draws out the flavors of the fish. It can only be used in the freshest fish and the results are absolutely magical.

Aji, is a hikari mono shiny fish because the fish are really shiny. In Japanese, hikari mono indicates a more prominent sea taste vs subtle ocean like with shiro mi zakana white fish like trouts and snappers (hirame, tai, hamachi, etc.)

Now the toppings seem complex but really not. It complements the fish and rice instead of taking over the flavors. This one piece of nigiri was a stand-out.

1. daikon oroshi grated daikon
Daikon is a Japanese radish and is in season during the winter. It’s used in grated form added to many foods in Japanese cuisine. It’s topped on grilled or raw fish, added to udon, rice bowls, grilled vegetables like eggplant. In solid form, daikon is added to a lot of our winter dishes like oden, nabe hot pot. Daikon and daikon oroshi is a must in any Japanese kitchen.

This piece of nigiri had a teensy dollop of daikon oroshi.

2. Kujyo negi
Negi is Japanese green onions or scallions. Kujyo negi is just a variation of Japanese green onion. The root portion is a bit thicker and seen in hot pots or sukiyaki whole.

3. Myoga
Myoga is a type of ginger and they are so delicious.

They come in two forms: stick or bulb:

They are commonly used as a garnish for grilled foods – generally fish. Both the stick and bulb can also be pickled to eat with rice. Yum.

For the sushi, the itamae-san sushi chef cut them in ultra thin strips and added the teensy bulb shape on the aji. The nigiri was then spritzed with kabosu (a citrus that is used when yuzu is out of season).

And there you have it – sushi garnish 101.
You’re welcome.

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