Ferran Adrìa and Daniel Boulud

I get it. I do. We all cut corners.

Ina Garten uses store bought marinara (Rao’s) as does Giada de Larentiis. Rick Bayless uses Tamazula hot sauce. Andrew Zimmern (4x James Beard winner) uses Sam’s BBQ Sauce and Trader Joe’s brand harissa (wtf), on and on, if you do Google searches, there are loads of information.

Almost all of the store-bought products from top chefs make sense. Why bother wasting time and energy making them if store bought ones taste better? Personally, I veer from house-made / homemade ketchup and mayo — Heinz still makes the best ketchup, Hellman’s and Kewpie for mayo.

However, there are two unforgivable offenses I just can not get over.

  1. (points below)

and 2. (points below)

In no means am I a purist but these are three star Michelin chefs!!!!!! Preserved lemons are just salt and water. Variations may have added spices and lemon juice but come on! What is so difficult about tossing some spices or squeezing juice? Not to mention, he is a master chef and restauranteur who owns chains and employs thousands of people. He can easily have minions make preserved lemons. Buying pre-made is just lazy.

Ferran Adrìa is the genius behind elBulli, the now defunct mothership that bred countless of world-class chefs dazzling Europe. And he uses dashi powder? WTF. Dashi powder is the equivalent to bouillon cubes of Japanese cooking: FLAVORLESS SALT BOMBS.

I am strangely disappointed, extremely offended, and most of all sad, since I no longer trust these chefs.. If Chef Daniel Boulud can’t even prepare his own preserved lemons, what else does he cut corners on? Makes me never, ever, want to step foot into Daniel or any Boulud restaurant ever again.

Oh, well.

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Yes, We are Related

My brother went to the PGA Masters in Augusta last weekend and these are the only photos he sent.

Waffle House, because they don’t exist in California ahahahahahhaha PRIORITIES!

Proof we are related — we only think of all things food.

The French Laundry #throwback

One of the greatest things about Twitter is how bits of information are shared, which is probably due to how anyone can post whatever they feel like quickly. The 280 character limit and knowing the information will most likely pass through a vortex of information and disappear into the Internet blackhole relieves pressures of thinking too much … which is beneficial for the masses as we can see deeper into our favorite people/brands/businesses that are normally out of reach. (Usually — as I am obviously taking politics out of the equation.)

The other day a friend alerted me to The French Laundry’s Tweet, sharing their opening night menu in 1979 (!!!)

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Fast forward to 1994, Thomas Keller bought the building and in 2018, TK is arguably still one of the top 5 chefs in North America, and TFL is one of the greatest restaurants in America.

The original handwritten menu on opening night, though, beautifully sums up the state of food in America in the 70’s and up until the late-00’s (perhaps early 2010) when the American public finally started caring about food.

Take a look:

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“Fresh asparagus” and “rice” are on the menu — wow.

America, you have come a long way! And thank you, Chef Keller, for being on the forefront of the food revolution in the U.S. Much love and respect.

Snow in Tokyo!

As of late, I spend most of my time in Bangkok but I’m back in Tokyo for a quick trip and… it SNOWED.

The snow in Tokyo is exactly like this country: Soft, unobtrusive, calm, peaceful, beautiful. The tidying process is pretty efficient so there are barely inconveniences caused. At least in the areas I navigate (Ebisu, Aoyama, Shibuya, Roppongi) so it’s not a massive pain to get around and panic doesn’t break out like it did when I lived in NYC.

Here are some photos.

…because Japan!

In a 2011 interview with The Wall Street Journal’s Scene Asia blog, Yoshikazu Ono, son of Jiro Ono, the star of 2011’s “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” documentary, Yoshikazu was asked why there are no female chefs or apprentices at his father’s $300 per person sushi restaurant, Sukiyabashi Jiro. His response:

“The reason is because women menstruate. To be a professional means to have a steady taste in your food, but because of the menstrual cycle, women have an imbalance in their taste, and that’s why women can’t be sushi chefs.”

via this piece from Business Insider.

Another gem from the piece:

Unfortunately his belief that a woman’s palate is inferior to a man’s is not uncommon in Japan, where other prevailing myths warn that women’s hands are too small and warm to handle sushi, and that their makeup and perfume will ruin the taste of the fish.

Hahahahhaha wow.

Q: What is the most Japanese thing ever?

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I'm asked all the time why things in Japan just seem 'better' (and I use this the term better lightly), this basically sums up Japan.

Adversity to change, is the reason a lot of our traditions are still intact.  And lots of inefficiency and careful double, triple, even quadruple checks for the most mundane things makes for perfection. Good, bad, or indifferent, to live here everyday is pretty annoying (or mendoukusai as we say in Japanese) but the trade-off is this unmatched attention to detail that makes a lot of things in this country incredible.

Read the rest of the answers here

North Korea-o-Rama

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This has nothing to do with food or booze but it does have to do with Japan so I’m leaving a cluster of word vomit here. Over the past few months, tensions between N. Korea and the world are so high, Kim Jong-un keeps launching missiles towards Japan. I was freaked out for a bit but then I realized something.

This is from one of the many conversations between my younger brother and me (no filter, no editing, inappropriate foul language is present):

Me: So I’ve been thinking about the North Korea bomb situation. And how that crazy son of a bitch keeps fake launching miscles. Missiles? Shit I don’t know how to spell that darn word. Nucs. Bombs. Whatever.

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